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Kaitlyn Willcoxon

Kaitlyn Willcoxon has written 40 posts for econobytes

Friendly neighborhood technologists

Unlike on Main Street, in a virtual business customers and competitors, whether around the corner or around the world, are equally close.   But when there’s no neighboring start-up to pop into, it’s difficult to know what virtual business is actually around the corner. While the Internet does make in-person meetings less of a necessity … Continue reading

Technology lurches onward

Change is predictable, the rate of change is not.  Typically governments trail people in adoption but when a government manages to change before becoming irrelevant, leaders can usually avoid exile or execution. The new year has brought with it several major and minor headlines that, though reported disparately, show government leaders engaging with technology that … Continue reading

Prophecies are not housed in prices

If people could easily interpret the economy then “expertise in economics” would be redundant rather than a full-time profession.  In the attempt to gain insight, people, rather obsessively, watch different metrics as indications of whatever the economy seems to be doing and to predict its next move.  Housing prices provide one data point, where rising … Continue reading

Let LIBOR lie

The LIBOR manipulations show incredible hubris but little else.  In the world of finance, prices and rates rarely prove stable for long and unlike The Great Recession, the larger effects of these particular financial happenings appear negligible. LIBOR, the price one bank charges another on a loan, is important for reasons similar to prices in … Continue reading

Make Money, Not War

Humanitarians and politicians have spent decades and careers in attempts to end the conflict between Israel and Palestine.  The growing business between the two nations, particularly with Palestine supplying outsourcing services to Israel, has motivated some to suggest that peace may shortly follow. It is correct to note that business between the two implies cooperation. Two … Continue reading

Never fear, only humans can kill

The Pentagon recently released a statement, ostensibly to make people feel more secure or to show some degree of humanity, that, despite the increasingly capable technology, only a human being will decide to kill another human being.  This policy assumes that human judgement over decisions to kill people is always superior to a machine’s. One … Continue reading

Why touch that dial? Advertising can benefit consumers

Jana, the world’s largest mobile payment network, with access to 100% of cell users in over 100 countries throughout the developing world, could be the dystopic novel Feed finally realized.  For those of you who were not young adults in the early 2000’s , in the novel people have a device wired directly to their brain … Continue reading

Money’s on the move, slowly

Money that moves grows the economy.  Moving money means people spending, which signals potential profitability from production.  Greater production then leads to a greater Gross Domestic Product.  Anything that makes it easier to people to spend money, like a standard currency in the United States or credit cards, then grows GDP.  While mobile commerce or … Continue reading

Polonius erred; a borrower, please be

First the modern world eliminated debtors’ prison, making prison more a state of mind.  But with any number of people coming to collect and settle debts, prison might have been kinder: serving time in lieu of searching desperately under the mattress ad infinitum. The drama of financial crises and fiscal cliffs has obscured a defining … Continue reading

Searching for meaning but finding a Nietzsche

A Nietzschean Approach to Positive Psychology sounds like a method designed to send more people to the loony bin.  However, a forthcoming study in The Journal of Positive Psychology ends with the kind of call to action Nietzsche would write, if he were an academic. Nietzsche believed that a person could only become great through suffering.  Not the … Continue reading